EXCLUSIVE: PM Yang’s Bamenda Meeting Turns Desperate – Collaborators Beg Teachers to Save His Job

PM Yang in Bamenda acknowledges there is an Anglophone problem.
PM Yang in Bamenda acknowledges there is an Anglophone problem.

By Nfor Hanson Nchanji, Nov. 26, 2016

Cameroon Journal, Bamenda – Prime Minister Philemon Yang, unlike his colleagues in the Biya’s regime on Friday confessed in front of Anglophone Lawyers and teachers that there actually is an Anglophone problem in Cameroon. Yang spoke in Bamenda, chief town of the North West region where he was chairing a meeting aimed at arriving a deal that should have ended the ongoing strike by Lawyers and Teachers of the Northwest and Southwest Regions.

In the days following the PM’s meeting in Bamenda, some senior cabinet members of his gov’t, including Minister of Justice, Laurent Esso, Minister of Special Duties at the Presidency Paul Atanga Nji and Issa Tchiroma, Minister of Communication, had taken turns in the media telling Anglophones that their problems are not peculiar to others’ in the country. Yang

didn’t only acknowledge that the problem exist, but in trying to pacify the Lawyers and Teachers to broker a deal that ends their strike, he said that the Anglophone problem can be solved if everyone contributes in his or her own way.

Reacting to provocative statements by Atanga Nji that there exist no Anglophone problem,

Barrister Bobga Harmony Adressing The Press after  meeting with the PM.
Barrister Bobga Harmony Dressing The Press after meeting with the PM.

Yang suggested that Atanga Nji, did not speak as a Government Spokesman nor was he mandated to say so.

In his meeting with leaders of the Common Law Lawyers, the PM advised that they operate within the limit of the law and promised that the problem of wigs and gowns seized from Lawyers in Buea by the Police and Gendarmes during a previous strike will be resolved before next weekend.

Yang assured the Lawyers that he will meet with those at the Ministry of Justice to solve their litany of problems presented in a memorandum but which were never made available to the Press.

Speaking to the press after the meeting with the Prime Minister, President of North West Lawyers Association, NOWELA, Barrister Bobga Harmony said that discussions with the PM were cordial, a good start to find ways of resolving the problem, but cautioned that the meeting was only a start to finding a solution to the problem, insisting that the strike will continue until the lawyers meet in an enlarge meeting with Justice Minister Laurent Esso.

At the Teachers forum with the PM, we gathered that things got very heated – at some point they got to a deadlock and suspended the meeting to resume later. Coming out of the meeting after it resumed, like the Lawyers, the teachers insisted that the strike action will continue until a significant agreement is reached. They refused to accept what they termed mere promises, from the PM. Discussions with the PM were contentious, hot and went deep into the night of Friday November 25, we gathered.

The Cameroon Journal gathered from sources at the meeting that the Teachers were mounted so much pressure to call off the strike by PM Yang and his collaborators who assisted in the

deliberations. One of them is quoted as saying that “calling off the strike will mean saving their PM.” But the Teachers stood their grounds arguing that calling off the strike without any firm and practical resolution is out of question. Like the Lawyers, the Teachers were also told to write their demands in order of merit with deadlines.

Representing the Teachers Trade Unions were Dr. James Abangma, Tameh valentine ,Wilfred Tassang ,Afu Steve, Ayeah Emmanuel, Kimfon Michael and Tasi Ntang of SYNES-UB,TAC,CATTU,PEATTU,BATTUC, CeWOTU and CEF respectively.


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4 Comments

  1. The only way out is to ask the government that Anglophones handle their education by themselves as well as their justice system. But this will still be only the tip of the iceberg since lawyers and teachers are not the only ones affected by francophonizaton. it will be absurdly unthinkable to agree to anything which will still entrust our destiny in the hands of Francophones.

  2. It will be very important to clearly define who an Anglophone is. Issa Tchiroma’s definition is as stupid as he thinks. The fact that someone might learn and speak Chinese today does not make that person a Chinese. It will also be very important to issue stern warnings to our mission schools, who have over the years littered their institutions with francophone children. It will. Also, there is need to re-define the concept of regional balance. The current meaning, which holds that francophones be given 99% of all employments and appointments opportunities, and reduce Anglophone regions to industrial free regions should be completely modified. ENSET Kumba and Bamenda should admit many more Anglophones, proportional to the number which francophone ENSET of Douala admits Anglophones.

  3. It will be very important to clearly define who an Anglophone is. Issa Tchiroma’s definition is as stupid as he thinks. The fact that someone might learn and speak Chinese today does not make that person a Chinese. It will also be very important to issue stern warnings to our mission schools, who have over the years littered their institutions with francophone children. Also, there is need to re-define the concept of regional balance. The current meaning, which holds that francophones be given 99% of all employments and appointments opportunities, and reduce Anglophone regions to industrial free regions should be completely modified. ENSET Kumba and Bamenda should admit many more Anglophones, proportional to the number which francophone ENSET of Douala admits Anglophones.

  4. The police College in Mutengene should be for English speakers only. Gendarme and police officers posted to Anglophone Cameroon regions should have a good mastery of English. No Anglophone should speak French to a police or gendarme officer who is working in the north west or south west. English is the language of the Anglophone people and all transactions in the Anglophone regions must be done through the medium of English. Also, any form of whatever kind that has to be filled in by Anglophones (eg tax form etc) must have English sections in them or else Anglophones should design theirs with English only. Anglophone regions should set a board that scrutinises the appointment of Governors, SDOs, DOs, and other top officials. Most of them should be anglophones and any other must have a good command of the English language and must put the interest of the people in their jurisdiction first rather than that of the yaounde gang that appointed them.There is no turning back. God is with Anglophone Cameroonians. Our time has come.

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